Posted 1 day ago

kanrose:

YO READ THIS GODDAMNED THING BECAUSE FLIP IS SO GOSH DARNED TALENTED WITH COLOURS N SHIT AND SHE HAS BEEN FOR THE 3 YEARS I’VE KNOWN HER

(Source: glitchcube)

Posted 3 days ago

snowcaines:

skeletondan:

eridanxroxy:

deepthroatmom:

ratak-monodosico:

article here>

cool lol

"cool lol" tHEYRE ACTUALLY TESTING TO FIND OUT IF WE’RE LIVING INSIDE A COMPUTER SIMULATION AND YOUR RESPONSE TO THAT IS

"COOL LOL"

They’ve done the tests, and have evidence that our universe may actually be a simulation: http://www.nature.com/news/simulations-back-up-theory-that-universe-is-a-hologram-1.14328

It’s less that we may be living within a computer simulation, but more like the foundations of our universe ( the laws of physics) are written on a lower dimensional plane, and the observable universe that we see is a projection (simulation) up onto a higher dimension.

Here’s some background: http://www.technologyreview.com/view/429561/the-measurement-that-would-reveal-the-universe-as-a-computer-simulation/#comments

wait
are you telling me that
we’re in someones fucking sims game

(Source: fencehopping)

Posted 6 days ago
Um, hi! I was wondering if you could do a mini tutorial on how to colour clouds? (You don't have to do this uvu) I really love your word, I'm inspired by it!
Anonymous asked

askmeanato:

sojuice:

i got multiple questions about this, so i’ll just answer it on this ask

sorry i kept putting it off for so long…

so… i guess i would think of what kind of sky i would want

i like sunsets, so i’ll draw that

image

so i start with the very back color; it’s a dull purple

my intent is to go from purple/dark grey->peach/pink

image

i like to use this fuzzy brush

imagenot sure what to call these… the ‘back’ / ‘dark’ clouds?

i put on random splotches at 40~50% opacity of dark blue around the edges

image

imagei’m going to put my light source at the bottom right, so i put a rusty orange color slightly at 10~20% opacity

imagethen i blended the colors before i started to add more colors

the more you blend, the better the picture will look 8)

imagenow i put my pen at around size 8-10 to put in thin areas of peach/gold where the light will hit at around 60% opacity

image

color it where ever you think it looks good 

image

i like to adjust my colors and edit on sai

on an overlay layer on top of the drawing, i airbrushed so dark blue in at the top left and right

image

then near the end i like to use the combination of lower brightness and higher contrast

i’ll put a video later since my explanation is horrible most of the time…

sorry i put the drawing sideways… it wouldn’t fit

try these drawings for reference…

maybe use the eyedropper and use colors from these?

hope that helps 

this is for the multiple color asks received

image

Posted 6 days ago

snuggydeamon:

and because I ran out of room: 

Posted 6 days ago

The Unknown History of Latino Lynchings

independentcreativeservices:

image

The following is a summary & analysis of Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review article, “Law of the Noose: A History of Latino Lynching” by Richard Delgado.

SUMMARY

Delgado attempts to shed light on a largely unknown history of Latinos, particularly Mexican-Americans in the Southwest U.S., who were lynched between the years of 1846 and 1925. This is roughly the same time that many Blacks were lynched in the U.S., as well. While many know of the ominous and horrific fate that Blacks and African-Americans saw in the U.S., few know of the lynchings that Latinos were met with. Delgado challenges scholars and institutions by trying to unveil the truth on this shameful past, while exploring the history of these lynchings and explaining that “English-only” movements are a present-day form of lynchings.

Although research on Latino lynchings is relatively new, circa 2006-2009, lynchings have a deep rooted history. Such acts can be described as mob violence where person(s) are murdered/hanged for an alleged offense usually without a trial. Through reviewing of anthropological research, storytelling, and other internal & external interactions, there is believed to have been roughly 600 lynchings of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans beginning with the aftermath of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo (this document essentially ended the Mexican-American war, where Mexico surrendered half of its land to the U.S.). This grim fate of Blacks & Mexicans in the U.S. was intertwined; both groups were lynched by Anglos for reasons such as “acting uppity,” taking jobs away from Anglos, making advances toward Anglo women, cheating at cards, practicing “Witchcraft,” and refusing to leave land that Whites coveted. Additionally, Mexicans were lynched for acting “too Mexican;” for example, if Mexicans were speaking Spanish too loudly or showcasing aspects of their culture too defiantly, they were lynched. Mexican women may also been lynched if they resisted the sexual advances of Anglo men. Many of these lynchings occurred with active participation of law enforcement. In fact the article reiterates that the Texas Rangers had a special animus towards persons of Mexican descent. Considering that Mexicans had little to no political power or social standing in a “new nation,” they had no recourse from such corrupt organizations. Popular opinion was to eradicate the Southwest of Mexicans.

Many of these lynchings were treated as a public spectacle; Anglos celebrated each of these killings as if the acts were in accordance with community wishes, re-solidifying society and reinforcing civic virtue. Ringleaders of such lynchings often mutilated bodies of Mexicans, by shooting the bodies after individuals were already dead, cutting off body parts, then leaving the remains on display perhaps in hung trees or in burning flames.

These lynchings took place in the Southwest U.S., in present-day Texas, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Nevada, amongst other states. The killings were carried out by vigilantes or other masked-men, as a form of “street justice.” These killings became so bad that the Mexican government lodged official complaints to the U.S. counsel in Mexico. Given that this region of the U.S. was at one time Mexican land, and it was shared with Indian/Indios, Mexicans, and Anglos, protests against the lynchings emerged. As legend has it, Joaquin Murrieta took matters into his own hands by murdering the Anglos responsible for the death of mythical figures Juan Cortina and Gregorio Cortes. Such acts were short-lived and perpetuated the conflict between Mexicans and Anglos.

Delgado goes on to cite that only some U.S. historians have written about these Latino lynchings and have pointed out that they occurred due to racial prejudice, protection of turf, and Yankee nationalism left over from the Mexican-American War. However, it has been concluded that such lynchings are a relatively unknown history due to a global pattern of shaping discourse as to avoid embarrassment of the dominant group. Those in power often have the ability to edit official records.

Further exploration reveals that these lynchings were not only edited & minimized outright, but were also ignored or misrepresented due to primary accounts in community newspapers being written in Spanish. Since very few mainstream historians read Spanish or consulted with these records, they were left to flounder. Also, many Latinos knew of these lynchings; their accounts were maintained, shared, and solidified as Mexican lore through ritualistically songs (corridos, actos, and cantares). Many oral cultures have equivalences of such interpretations. Today, Latino scholars are not surprised by history’s ignoring of such events; postcolonial theory describes how colonial societies almost always circulate accounts of their invasions that flatter and depicts them as the bearers of justice, science, and humanism. Conversely, the natives were depicted as primitive, bestial, and unintelligent. Subsequently, colonialists must civilize the natives, use the land & its resources in a better fashion, and enact a higher form of justice. The “official history” is written by the conquerors, thus showing them in the best possible light.

Delgado questions whether such remnants of Latino lynchings may still be present in society today. This can best be exemplified through movements to make English the official language of the U.S., forcing immigrants to assimilate to the dominant Anglo culture. Such actions can be illustrated in movements to end bilingual school opportunities and enforce English-only speaking at jobs, businesses, etc. Postcolonial scholars argue that such movements facilitate children to reject their own culture, acquire English, and forget their native language. These actions have far dire [documentable] consequence, like social distress, depression, and crime. As such, Delgado ventures to say that these actions are an implicit form of lynching.

Delgado ends the piece by saying that hidden histories of aggression, unprovoked war, lynchings, and segregation are corroborated/proliferated today by the mass media and entertainment industry. These groups, along with other scholars, have the opportunity to redress this history and reject further practices against Latinos. Otherwise, marginalized groups find themselves in a position where they are alienated from their family/identity/culture, co-opted, and unable to resist further oppression.

ANALYSIS

Such history is imperative to the framework of Americana and for acknowledgement purposes, not only because it is a matter of fact, but because this history is relevant to the ancestors of the land. History has always been exploited to benefit those who are in power, so to maintain their structures. However, today, I would argue that current powerbrokers would gain more respect & credibility by being honest with themselves and the actual history. Continuing to deny or ignore the history does an injustice to all. Current Chicanos, Mexican-Americans, and Americans alike would most benefit from this restoration for a few reasons.

First, a corrected version of history helps the people better understand themselves. Americans, Mexicans, the fusion of the two, in addition to people of the world, would recognize a better sense of their true identity & culture. The exploration of such history can perhaps allow for analysis of current rates of depression, crime/incarceration, and socioeconomic status(es). If we, the people, want to understand ourselves, we need to know the truth.

Secondly, if we want to understand why things are the way they are today, we can look to history. This shameful past can assist us in the interpretation of Mexican/American relations. Additionally, I believe that this understanding will help both groups reach a common ground with current relations. Since the year 2000 alone, the FBI has reported over 2,500 hate crimes against Latinos based on race and ethnicity. The U.S. is marred with a nasty & stalled immigration battle that is masked for hatred against Mexicans. In 2014, there is a continued, on-going crisis at the Southwest border affecting many children and families. With the history of these lynchings, it is now time for the “greatest country in the world” to make the wrong things right.

Again, we know that history can repeat itself, but only if we let it. Thus, the entire world needs to be educated on the true history of these lynchings. The more we are educated on such atrocities, the less likely we will allow them to happen again. Attacking the access of this knowledge is the third reason to explore this history. Ignoring the disastrous past does not make the history go away. With the knowledge of the truth, the Latino people can empower themselves to conquer stereotypes and achieve further greatness. Most Chicano/Latino studies programs in schools allow students to learn about their past while achieving higher marks. But in states like Arizona, educational officials have banned Chicano/Latino Studies in schools, and as a result have not allowed students to know the true history of the land they currently inhabit. This is not only a further atrocity, but it reaffirms Delgado’s point that current lynchings, lynchings of the mind, are happening today.  This is blatant lying and it is unacceptable; when we lie to our government, we go to prison. When our government lies to us, it’s no big deal.

Furthermore, for those who are tired of people of color in the U.S. raising points of contention about racial issues in this country, you now see the justification. This is why we won’t be quiet about racism, racial prejudice, discrimination, etc. This is why we’ll march in the streets for the Trayvonn Martin’s, reject the school to prison pipeline, and continue to spread awareness until administrative action is taken on a grand scale. Today’s generation is a bi-product and reflection of this history; not only are these “lynchings” continuing to happen, but the masterplan has worked. In order to achieve our full capabilities, we need to reject a fragmented history and seek a personal revolution, which starts with ourselves. And we can achieve this revolution through education & knowledge.

Be empowered.

Maximo Anguiano is a scholar, activist, and creative. More works can be found at www.independentcreativeservices.tumblr.com.

REFERENCES

The Law of the Noose: A History of Latino Lynching. R. Delgado (2009). Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, 44, 297-312.

Posted 6 days ago

Starry Night Brush for Sai Paint

grumpybuneary:

discordtrolls:

image

image

dude

Posted 2 weeks ago

jameskirke:

THIS MODERN LOVE // a love story for the new age, for late night hand-holding under neon skies that light up your face, for digital heartbeats and synthesized sighs and electric eyes cast towards your sweetheart who shimmers like kaleidoscopic stars in the midnight sky. 

listen | download

(Source: jameskirke)

Posted 2 weeks ago

Wines for people who hate wine.

fuckingrecipes:

HAVE YOU BEEN INVITED TO A FANCY-ASS DINNER PARTY? DO YOU THINK WINE TASTES SHITTY AND YOU CAN’T SEE WHY PEOPLE THINK SIPPING NASTY-ASS CRAP IS CLASSY?

WELL PULL UP YOUR BRITCHES, BECAUSE IT’S TIME TO EDUCATE YOUR PEASANT ASS. 

HERE ARE SOME WINES THAT EVEN WINE-HATERS CAN EASILY LEARN TO LOVE! 

THEY’RE MORE FRUITY, LESS FULL OF TANNINS  AND ARE PERFECT FOR EITHER PEOPLE WANTING TO GET INTO NICE WINES, OR WHO HAD BAD EXPERIENCE WITH SHITTY WINE.  

TANNINS: Bitter, and make your mouth feel dry

ACIDS: Sour, and make you salivate

SWEETNESS: Obviously sweet. These three traits are generally determined by the type of grape and how long it was allowed to ripen on the vine before harvesting.

ALCOHOL: Also makes a wine sweeter. Alcohol content for wine usually falls between 5% and 20%

(NOTE: Actual Champagne is a super-specific type of sparkling wine made from the special grapes grown in the Champagne region of France, and underwent a second fermentation to get bubbly as well as adhered to France’s crazy strict regulations. Many people I know will call any sparkling white wine ‘Champagne’ - It has acheived ‘Generic Trademark’ statues, meaning people will use that type of product with the specific brand interchangeably, like ‘Kleenex’ and facial tissues. Unless each bottle costs close to 100$, I highly doubt you’re drinking real Champagne. )

image

Moscato: ”Barefoot” brand Pink Moscato is fucking delicious. Tastes a bit like grape, strawberry, peach and red apple had a strange, mildly alcoholic baby. Usually around 5-10% alcohol content.  Works terrific as a Dessert wine, and accents anything ‘Creamy’ really well. Slightly bubbly. #1 recommended wine for newbies. 

Normal Moscato is also delicious as hell, a bit more citrus-y.

image

Zinfandel: White Zinfandel especially is super mild in taste, mildly sweet, fruity. (Don’t let the name fool you - it’s colored pink!) It’s the kind of wine that you accidentally gulp down like juice, because it doesn’t kick you in the throat with a strong taste or immediate alcoholic burn. Around 15% alcohol. 

I shit you not, I buy it by the huge-ass jug. As long as you get a good top to reseal it, it’ll last a hella long time after opening. 

Normal Zinfadel is also delicious, but White is definitely an introductory wine. 

image

Cava: Spanish Sparkling Wine. Vaguely bubbly, light, Kinda lemony and pear-ish and a little bitter. Don’t expect sweetness. ‘Asda’ brand is excellent, I like it for winter holiday dinners. 

image

Prosecco: Basically a poor-man’s Champagne.  It is a wine for any occasion; Dinner, Chillaxing, Sharing with friends, whatever. ~12% alcohol. Mild fruit flavors (Like pear and apricot), and you can also choose whether you want fully-sparkling or partial-sparkling (How much you want it to bubble)

Italians love this shit enough to sell it in cans. 

image

Because nothing says ‘Love’ like aluminum containers. 

Unfortunately, it grows stale in the bottle after 2 years or so. Gotta drink it right after buying~

Zonin Asti  NV / 750 ml.

Asti: Sweet!…and sour? Interesting flavor. Not sweet like candy, but…like well-ripened fruit. Good dessert wine. Often has a flowery, nutty kind of smell and a hint of that in the flavor as well. Best served chilled, and NOT AGED. If left in the bottle for more than two years, it deteriorates quickly and loses the nice fruity flavors. Blech. 

image

Reisling: This wine is fruity, but highly acidic. It goes well with strongly-spiced and aromatic dishes, like Thai or things with Allspice/Cinnamon.  Excellent taste, but some Aged versions have a faint smell like gasoline, which may turn newbies off.  8-10% Alcohol.

image

Muscat: HELLA FUCKING SWEET. Like, kicks you in the throat with sweetness. Definitely a dessert wine. Not something I would drink a glass of, without something to eat between sips. ~15% alcohol.  Alternately, you could pour a bit of Muscat into a stronger, more bitter glass of wine to make a balanced flavor. 

Posted 3 weeks ago

roccoconut:

aviantheatrics:

celesteboldlygoes:

yaheardwithperd:

sarrel:

Ingredients:

CINNAMON FILLING:
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, just melted (not boiling)
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar
1/2 tablespoon ground cinnamon

CREAM CHEESE GLAZE:
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
2-ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
3/4 cup powdered sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

PANCAKES:
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup milk
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil

Directions:

Prepare the cinnamon filling: In a medium bowl, stir together the butter, brown sugar and cinnamon. Scoop the filling into a quart-sized heavy zip baggie and set it aside (see *Tips below).

Prepare the glaze: In a small pan, heat the butter over low heat until melted. Turn off the heat and whisk in the cream cheese until it is almost smooth. Sift the powdered sugar into the pan, stir and add in vanilla extract. Set the pan aside while you make the pancakes.

Prepare the pancake batter: In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt. Whisk in the milk, egg and oil, just until the batter is moistened (a few small lumps are fine).

Cook the pancakes: Heat a large, nonstick skillet over medium-heat and spray with nonstick spray. Use an ice cream scoop (or 1/3 cup measuring cup) to add the batter to the pan. Use the bottom of the scoop or cup to spread the batter into a circle (about 4-inches in diameter). Reduce the heat to medium low. Snip the corner of your baggie of cinnamon filling and squeeze the filling into the open corner. When your pancake begins to form bubbles, add the filling. Starting at the center of the pancake, squeeze the filling on top of the pancake batter in a swirl (just as you see in a regular cinnamon roll). Cook the pancake 2 to 3 minutes, or until the bubbles begin popping on top of the pancake and it’s golden brown on the bottom. Slide a thin, wide metal spatula underneath the pancake and gently but quickly flip it over. Cook an additional 2 to 3 minutes, until the other side is golden as well. When you flip the pancake onto a plate, you will see that the cinnamon filling has created a crater-swirl of cinnamon. Wipe out the pan with a paper towel, and repeat with the remaining pancake batter and cinnamon filling. Re-warm the glaze briefly, if needed. Serve pancakes topped with a drizzle of glaze.

fuckin yuuum

BALLZZZ.

o hmy fuck

sweet mercy

Posted 1 month ago

brngrmln:

cyning:

after long minutes of in depth youtube research i have learned that japanese vine girl’s name is reika ozeki. here’s a compilation with some subtitles :o

YOURE A HERO